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  • Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)

    What Are Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)? Real estate investment trusts, or REITs (pronounced "reetz"), are funds that own, develop and manage income-producing properties in a range of real estate sectors, including shopping malls, offices and commercial buildings, residential apartments and health care facilities. Some of these trusts also invest in mortgages and other property loans. Basically, REITs collect rent from the tenants of these properties and distribute the income…

  • Cash Flow Statement

    What Is A Cash Flow Statement? A cash flow statement, also known as a statement of cash flow, is one of the main financial statements, along with the income statement and the balance sheet, that companies are required by securities regulators to prepare to demonstrate their financial condition. The cash flow statement is important because it shows investors and creditors how well a company manages its cash and that it…

  • Value Investing

    What Is Value Investing? Value investing is an investment strategy in which the investor seeks to profit by buying stocks they believe are underpriced or undervalued by the market at large. The investor looks to buy stocks when they believe they are "on sale," just as they would buy a box of cereal at the supermarket when it's on sale rather than paying full price. The idea of value investing…

  • Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR)

    What Is Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR)? The Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR) is an interest rate benchmark chosen by the Alternative Reference Rates Committee (ARRC) in 2017 as an alternative and eventual replacement for the London Interbank Offered Rate, more commonly known as Libor, which is slated to be phased out by 2021. ARRC is a committee set up by the U.S. Federal Reserve Board and the Federal Reserve…

  • Systemically Important Financial Institutions (SIFIs)

    What Are Systemically Important Financial Institutions (SIFIs)? Systemically Important Financial Institutions, or SIFIs, are a group of 29 large international banks that are required to hold extra equity capital against losses because of their size, complexity and importance to the international financial system. These institutions are generally regarded as "too big to fail," meaning they would require being bailed out by taxpayers if they were threatened with failure during a…

  • Safe Haven Assets

    What Is A Safe Haven Asset? Safe haven assets are investments that investors turn to during times of market volatility and instability, i.e., to "weather the storm." These investments are perceived to be safe from losses during market turmoil or are negatively correlated to the market at large, meaning they may go up in price when the majority of other assets, mainly stocks, are losing value. Most Common Safe Haven…

  • Fiat Money

    Fiat money has value because the government has declared that it does. This kind of money has no intrinsic value, but since a government supports it, fiat currency can be exchanged for goods and services. Let's now look at exactly what fiat money is, how it can be used, and its benefits and downfalls. Money Basics Money comes in many different forms. However, anything that is used as money needs…

  • Balance Sheet

    What Is A Balance Sheet? The balance sheet is one of the three most important documents—the other two are income statement and the statement of cash flow—that companies produce that enable their investors to examine and assess their financial health. Publicly traded companies are required to produce and publish these documents regularly, usually once per quarter, to shareholders as well as to tax and regulatory authorities. The balance sheet shows…

  • Warrants

    What Is A Warrant? A warrant is a security that gives the holder the right to purchase a company's stock or bond at a specific price by a certain date. Warrants are similar to options, but warrants are issued directly by a company, usually as an incentive to get investors to buy the company's stock or bonds. Options, by contrast, are a contract between two parties in which the holder…

  • Dutch Disease

    Conventional wisdom suggests that prosperity and currency appreciation are good for the welfare of a nation. However, if domestic wealth increases too quickly, a phenomenon known as Dutch disease may prove detrimental to the long-term economic health of an afflicted country. What Is Dutch Disease? Dutch disease is a financial expression used to describe the negative influence that a sudden appreciation of a nation's wealth and domestic currency can have…

  • Convertible Bonds

    What Is A Convertible Bond? Convertible bonds are a hybrid security that act mainly as a bond but also give the holder the right to convert the security into common shares of the issuing company at certain times and usually at the investor's option. Unlike traditional corporate bonds, convertibles offer investors a limited opportunity to participate if the stock of the issuing company rises. If the company's stock falters, investors…

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Any opinions, news, research, analyses, prices, other information, or links to third-party sites contained on this website are provided on an "as-is" basis, as general market commentary and do not constitute investment advice. The market commentary has not been prepared in accordance with legal requirements designed to promote the independence of investment research, and it is therefore not subject to any prohibition on dealing ahead of dissemination. Although this commentary is not produced by an independent source, Friedberg Direct, FXCM or its affiliates takes all sufficient steps to eliminate or prevent any conflicts of interests arising out of the production and dissemination of this communication. The employees of Friedberg Direct and FXCM commit to acting in the clients' best interests and represent their views without misleading, deceiving, or otherwise impairing the clients' ability to make informed investment decisions. For more information about the Friedberg Direct's internal organizational and administrative arrangements for the prevention of conflicts, please refer to the Firms' Managing Conflicts Policy. Please ensure that you read and understand our Full Disclaimer and Liability provision concerning the foregoing Information, which can be accessed here.**

Spreads Widget: When static spreads are displayed, the figures reflect a time-stamped snapshot as of when the market closes. Spreads are variable and are subject to delay. The spread figures are for informational purposes only. Friedberg Direct is not liable for errors, omissions or delays, or for actions relying on this information.

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